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  • De captivants à banals, les articles et photographies de “The Baguette” sont une tentative de publier un journal de ma vie dans la Manche et de proposer un forum de discussion pour tout ce qui touche à la Normandie.
  • De captivants à banals, les articles et photographies de “The Baguette” sont une tentative de publier un journal de ma vie dans la Manche et de proposer un forum de discussion pour tout ce qui touche à la Normandie.

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April 16 2014 4 16 /04 /April /2014 13:05

163 Théâtre gallo-romain de Lillebonne159 Théâtre gallo-romain de Lillebonne

It’s hard not to get upset sometimes by the unusual opening and closing times of some places in France but it seems to be more common with me when I travel because things that I really want to see are more often than not always closed. It’s so frustrating. Case in point is the Roman amphitheatre in Lillebonne. I already knew that it was undergoing some excavations and that it had only recently been reopened to the public but what I couldn’t find out from the internet were the opening and closing times. Wouldn’t you know it; I arrived just five minutes after they had closed the gates. 164 Théâtre gallo-romain de LillebonneI guess it wasn’t a really big deal since most of the amphitheatre can be easily seen from the road in front of the municipal museum. It was built in the first and second century and the central arena follows the usual plan of amphitheatres in northwest Gaul, where all kinds of spectacles were held (mythological scenes, gladiator fights, performing animals, hunts with small game). 165 Théâtre gallo-romain de LillebonneThe crowd watched from the cave, a series of stands probably made of wood. In the nearby park are the remains of a fortress rebuilt in the 12th and 13th centuries by William the Conqueror who assembled his barons here before invading England. 168 LillebonneOnce again, entry to this was closed.

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Published by The Baguette - in Architecture
April 10 2014 5 10 /04 /April /2014 08:09

023 Église Sainte-Trinité-Saint-Sauveur-de-Pierrepont

A few weeks ago I took the car out to visit some places around La Haye-du-Puit including the Église Sainte-Trinité in the small village of Saint-Sauveur-de-Pierrepont.  It was built in 1955 to replace the old church which was destroyed by the Germans in 1944.   024 Église Sainte-Trinité-Saint-Sauveur-de-Pierrepont 030 Église Sainte-Trinité-Saint-Sauveur-de-Pierrepont

The inside is fairly modern with an arched ceiling.  It still retains some objects from the old church including this 12th century bas-relief of Christ in Majesty.  031 Ancienne église de Saint-Sauveur-de-Pierrepont034 Ancienne église de Saint-Sauveur-de-Pierrepont035 Ancienne église de Saint-Sauveur-de-Pierrepont036 Ancienne église de Saint-Sauveur-de-Pierrepont

About 200 meters away are the ruins of the old Romanesque church.  It still maintains an outline of its old walls and some fine 12th century bas-reliefs in the choir including an image of Saint Matthew and another of a lion which represents the evangelist, Saint Mark.  037 Ancienne église de Saint-Sauveur-de-Pierrepont038 Ancienne église de Saint-Sauveur-de-Pierrepont

The ends of several columns still have sculpted heads which are in ecxellent condition.  Outside, behind the choir is a memorial plaque to some French soldiers who died on this spot defending the town against Germans during the war.  033 Ancienne église de Saint-Sauveur-de-PierrepontOn 18 June 1940, a French detachment composed of survivors from several other units used two 75 mm guns to stop the advancement of Rommel's 7th Panzer Division.  Led by Naval engineer, Henri Ramas, the troops delayed the German advance by more than ten hours which allowed the British forces to regroup and perform sabotage missions on equipment that could be used by the enemy.  Sadly, Henri Ramas and many of his men were killed on this spot during the fighting.

041 Ancienne église de Saint-Sauveur-de-Pierrepont

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Published by The Baguette - in Architecture
March 23 2014 1 23 /03 /March /2014 11:23

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7328/13125422093_5cce84ca0f_b.jpgThere was originally an important Gaulish sanctuary on the archaeological site of Jublains.  Following the conquest of Gaul by Julius Caesar, the Romans divided the country into districts and built towns which correspond to the present administrative centers.  The district of Aulerques Diablintes was named after the local Gaulish people and the town of Noviodunum was built at an ancient crossroads.  http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7362/13125595884_0343e7b93b.jpgThe main buildings have already been uncovered and can be visited: the baths which were discovered during the restoration of the church, the ruins of Jublains Roman Fort, the temple and the theatre are the best local remains of the Gallo-Roman period in the region.  http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7380/13125307015_a914e4736b.jpghttp://farm4.staticflickr.com/3748/13125414133_b1c56dcf1c.jpghttp://farm3.staticflickr.com/2187/13125387933_9d725cbd00.jpghttp://farm8.staticflickr.com/7319/13125390243_4d599a6218.jpgAt the entrance to the fortress is the Departmental Museum of Archaeology.  This museum offers an introduction to the different sites and main archaeological themes of the Mayenne region, in particular the development of the Roman town of Jublains and the medieval pottery in the Laval region.  The site of Jublains is dealt with in more detail with the help of an audio-visual presentation and several large models which give a good idea of what it looked like in ancient times.  http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7303/13125296935_ffbb8af276.jpghttp://farm8.staticflickr.com/7388/13125404563_49cbf386dc.jpghttp://farm4.staticflickr.com/3805/13125574364_a9d218a923.jpghttp://farm8.staticflickr.com/7404/13125290125_cdb1d65b0f.jpgThe Gallo-Roman fortress consists of three concentric parts.  The central building, the oldest part of the fortress dating from the early 3rd century, is a massive rectangular storehouse with four angle towers.  It is lit by means of a central courtyard and is equipped with several wells and water tanks.  The gates and the external wall coverings are made of squared blocks.  http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7386/13125569884_1599ffe8ea.jpghttp://farm8.staticflickr.com/7432/13125567474_0275cd3cfd.jpghttp://farm4.staticflickr.com/3804/13125282775_14549efde1.jpgThe two small buildings in the north and south angles were bathhouses.  During the crisis which shook the Roman Empire at the end of the 3rd century (invasions, military anarchy, peasant rebellions…), the storehouse was surrounded by a rampart of raised earth and a moat.  This moat was later filled in to enable the construction of fortified walls around AD 290, just before the whole site was abandoned.  http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3815/13125592654_4346f8f644.jpghttp://farm4.staticflickr.com/3800/13125309045_d3170346b6.jpghttp://farm4.staticflickr.com/3813/13125581274_6f6fcf516a.jpgThe theatre is on the southern side of the plateau on which the town stretched out.  It thus benefits from a natural slope.  An inscription, exhibited in the museum revealed that this theatre was offered to the town by a person: Orgétorix, surely a rich Diablinte, member of the Decurion order, who ruled the city.  With its elliptic shape, Orgétorix’s theatre distinguishes itself from the classical Roman models, notably by the lack of a stage wall, replaced by a small semi-circular building.  http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7438/13125411813_f92c78c847.jpghttp://farm8.staticflickr.com/7457/13125383473_a048567632.jpgThe temple is situated at the other end of the Roman town.  A number of weapons offered as gifts were found on the site of the Gaulish sanctuary which was rebuilt under Nero in AD 65; its proportions were vast (each side being about 80m long) and limestone was brought especially from the Loire region.   A covered canal carried rain water to a heated pool situated on the outside of the temple and served as the building for ablutions.http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3757/13125558294_faa5815398.jpghttp://farm8.staticflickr.com/7318/13125380893_fb4389606a.jpg

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Published by The Baguette - in Architecture
March 23 2014 1 23 /03 /March /2014 10:13

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7387/13125268234_30aa29e33b.jpghttp://farm8.staticflickr.com/7351/13124980935_9a137479c1.jpgThis peaceful village occupies a picturesque setting on the summit of a rocky promontory commanding the north bank of the Erve.  http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3752/13124962275_ee0e8c5138.jpgIn the 11th century, the viscounts of Beaumont built on the site one of the most important Maine strong points.  http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3739/13125065543_a777c8986c.jpgSte-Suzanne, surrounded with ramparts, resisted the attacks of William the Conqueror.  His troops had made their camp at Beugy on the Assé-le-Beranger road.  http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3706/13125088613_2446e4c11d.jpgAfter a siege of three years (1083 – 1086) William abandoned his efforts and, out of respect for his opponent, Hubert II de Beaumont, he returned his lands of Fresnay and Beaumont.  During the Hundred Years War the English took possession of Ste-Suzanne (1425) and remained its overlords for 14 years.  http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3672/13125256694_61eb1d9ea6.jpghttp://farm4.staticflickr.com/3818/13125258694_73fbb65518.jpgA walk along the ramparts of the city offers visitors attractive views of the river below.  The town boasts several houses built in the Middle Ages and refurbished during the following centuries.  http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7333/13125054043_bf1799d92b.jpgThis is the salt loft, now turned into a dwelling.  It keeps its former door equipped with three different locks.  Three notables, each of them owning a keep, were needed to open the building.  It was from here that residents obtained their salt provision and paid the unpopular salt tax known as the “gabelle”.  http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7419/13125081573_83aa218d34.jpghttp://farm3.staticflickr.com/2260/13124969795_d5fbf1464e.jpghttp://farm8.staticflickr.com/7300/13125077823_9e2867e7f7.jpgFrom the Middle Ages to the 18th century, the castle of Sainte-Suzanne had a military function, visible in its fortifications.  This is the Iron Door or secondary entrance to the castle.  http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7405/13124946245_b1d8c4b20c.jpghttp://farm4.staticflickr.com/3682/13125059383_d4d010b69f.jpghttp://farm8.staticflickr.com/7372/13125067703_2f723b8d2e.jpgThe most impressive piece of architecture remaining from the original fortifications is the 11th century keep.  Between 2001 and 2003, the keep was restored and archaeological observations were made on the masonry to learn about their transformations.  It is impossible to know the height of the original keep because the summit has long since disappeared.  The ground floor was not a living space but a storage place.  The narrow openings served for light and air but not for shooting.  The first floor was considered the noble space, used for reception.  The room of the second floor is the highest and widest of the building and might have been a private room reserved to the lord and his family.  http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3755/13348744954_6a8a9bb165.jpgNext to the keep is the more recent Renaissance lodge.  In 1608, Guillaume Fouquet de la Varenne, new lord of Ste-Suzanne commanded the construction of a new castle.  The works probably lasted about five years yet the northern part is the only one to be finished.  http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3828/13124965885_13ab12617d.jpgThe interior is now the Centre of Interpretation of Architecture and Patrimony (CIAP).  http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7373/13124951445_d6f8390b96.jpghttp://farm8.staticflickr.com/7383/13124953595_a56d351ee7.jpgThe church of Ste-Suzanne, consecrated in 1553, was rebuilt in 1824 for the most part.  

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Published by The Baguette - in Architecture
January 16 2014 5 16 /01 /January /2014 11:31

http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5462/9014684699_4d2d94a62e_o.jpgMore of a palace than a château, Serrant has travelled through centuries without sustain any damage. The Renaissance château is built on the foundations of a medieval fortress. In 1749, the estate was sold by the last surviving descendant of the de Bautru family and was bought by Antoine Walsh, a shipowner whose family were exiled Jacobites. http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3690/9015871484_0c6cbdd089_o.jpgAs well as redecorating the interior of the castle, the Walsh family built an English style park, pavilions, and a monumental gate complete with the family crest. The château eventually passed out of the hands of the Walsh family in 1830 when Valentine Walsh de Serrant married the Duc de La Trémoïlle. http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5326/9014684785_34c455e140_o.jpghttp://farm6.staticflickr.com/5335/9015874102_35832a2fcd_o.jpghttp://farm4.staticflickr.com/3750/9014683577_478bd91537_o.jpgLa Trémoïlle assigned Luciene Magne the task of restoring the castle and several features, including parapets and cornices, were added. The La Trémoïlle family still own the château, and in the 20th century it was modernised with cellars and the introduction of electricity. http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3756/9014683439_452ac8f251_o.jpghttp://farm4.staticflickr.com/3687/9015872776_1647303b43_o.jpgAs you can see, it presents similarities with Valençay, Villandry and Chenonceau.  All very wonderful places to visit. The castle is notable for the library, stocked with 12,000 books; the vaulted halls, originally home to the kitchens; and Napoleon's bedroom, which was never used by the Emperor as he stayed at the castle for only two hours.  http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7333/9015871972_30fd453da5_o.jpgThe chapel is also the final resting place for many of the Trémoïlle family (many of whom died from tuberculosis or during the flu pandemic of 1918).  http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3682/9015871230_6ce6ca03ae_o.jpgIf it isn't cold and raining, as it was on the day I visited, a walk through the park would be quite enjoyable I think.

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Published by The Baguette - in Architecture
January 16 2014 5 16 /01 /January /2014 11:09

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8274/9015877810_fe19ca4ef2_o.jpgIt has been quite some time since I’ve posted anything here and I apologize for that to anyone who’s interested in reading what I have to say in my blog. Instead of doing my French homework or preparing for my English classes, I’m once again distracting myself from what is really important. It’s hard to believe we are already in 2014. Happy New Year everyone! Anyway, back to my travels in the Loire over the summer… One of the places I visited was the Château du Plessis-Bourré constructed in less than five years between 1468 to 1472 by Finance Minister Jean Bourré, the principal advisor to King Louis XI. http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5456/9015877002_1200e04ffa_o.jpghttp://farm6.staticflickr.com/5445/9014687047_1c18e7ffbf_o.jpgThe château has not been modified externally since its construction and still has a fully working drawbridge. Its moats are among the widest in France. I have no photos of the interior because photography is strictly forbidden during the guided tour of the property. It still retains, in the guardroom, an extraordinary painted ceiling. Many of the scenes which were painted some five centuries ago are still an unsolved mystery. Here is an excellent link to a French website that has some amazing photos of the painted panels as well as descriptions. The château also houses other masterpieces such as tapestries, paintings, woodwork and furniture.http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7313/9014685745_2fd4d85198_o.jpg http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7429/9014685809_390f09a1a5_o.jpgThis is an image of the immense courtyard. http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2810/9015875972_071d9f358d_o.jpgLooking back from the drawbridge, one can see the stables and outbuildings, now used for exhibits and a souvenir shop.

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Published by The Baguette - in Architecture
December 5 2013 5 05 /12 /December /2013 11:01

http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7350/9015887670_b8c370b07f_o.jpgAll along the Loire are some interesting small villages that have maintained many of their medieval buildings. The castle keep catches your eye as soon as you approach the village of Trèves. It is nearly 50 meters tall and was part of an important castle, which dates back to the 11th century and was rebuilt in the mid-fifteenth century by Robert Lemacon, lord of Trier and Chancellor of Charles VII, King of France. Its shape is the result of the joining of a round tower and a square tower. Sadly, the rest of the castle no longer exists. The tower can be seen clearly from the cemetery of the Eglise Saint-Aubin which dates from the 11th century.http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7391/9014697675_657a09c2b8_o.jpg

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Published by The Baguette - in Architecture
December 3 2013 3 03 /12 /December /2013 11:00

http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2884/9015893410_ed8ee4aaae_o.jpgThis is the Eglise Saint-Simplicien located in the town of Martigné-Briand.  It has a very interesting bell tower which was originally built in the second half of the 13th century but was rebuilt in 1874.  From a distance, the bell tower appears to be a missile or even a large rocket getting ready to take off. The apse and entrance arches of the ambulatory walls of the choir date from the 12th century.  The immense nave is brightly lit with several stained glass windows.  http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5348/9015893592_5a35221629_o.jpgThe church rests beside the ruins of the ancient château built in 1503 by René de la Jumellière. I think that it would have been a very cool visit if I had the time but I was on my way to Saumur and I only had time to stop and take a few photos.http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8129/9015893516_2581cd56d9_o.jpg  

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Published by The Baguette - in Architecture
January 10 2013 5 10 /01 /January /2013 15:54

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8355/8340779635_44648b780d_b.jpgSaint William's Church (also called Wilhelmskirche in German and église Saint-Guillaume in French) is a gothic church belonging to the Lutherans Slightly set back from the intersection of the wharfs of the shipbuilders and the fishermen, the church is striking for its picturesque location on the bank of the Ill river, the lopsided character of its exterior, and its sumptuous interior combining the Gothic and Baroque styles.  http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8353/8341837834_40a93aaa51_b.jpgIt was closed the afternoon I wanted to go inside.  Instead, I sat across the river from it and enjoyed the view after as I ate my slice of pizza for lunch.  I know that there are a lot of churches with the same name in Strasbourg so I am trying not to get them all mixed up.  http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8071/8341831674_d0bc2ec465_b.jpgThis is the Protestant church of St-Nicholas.  Albert Schweitzer was pastor in the Church Saint-Nicolas, where he blessed on April 11, 1908 the marriage of Theodor Heuss, first president of the Federal Republic of Germany.  http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8496/8341837326_7e787e3f42_b.jpgIt stands along the River Ill which was overflowing its banks while I was there.  http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8072/8341836726_b26c6a029f_b.jpgAcross the river are several attractive timber framed houses.  http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8496/8341840670_ed637f8db6_b.jpgThis attractive church is the Catholic Church of Saint-Pierre-le-Jeune.  http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8079/8340781155_13a13b9a75_b.jpgIt is located in the German district, right next to the Palace of Justice. It is one of the great architectural achievements realized during the annexation. The pink and red sandstone church was built from 1889 to 1893 by architects August Hartel and Skjold Neckelmann in the Romanesque Revival style and crowned by the vast cupola. The one Catholic church that I wanted to visit besides the cathedral and it was closed...of course.  http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8363/8340780705_e5d4aec4e5_b.jpgAnother building located within the German district is the Palais du Rhin, the former imperial palace built for the German Emperor Willim I of Hohenzollern after the war of 1870.  It took almost five years before being fully completed.  http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8215/8341849904_01ff6109d7_b.jpgThis is the Palais de Rohan.  It used to be the Bishop's Palace built in 1704 but now houses the Museum of Decorative Arts.  http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8358/8341831358_ecb9288a62_b.jpghttp://farm9.staticflickr.com/8223/8340786847_58e415827d_b.jpgNext to the Strasbourg Historical Museum is the former Customs House dating back to the 14th century.  This building was almost entirely destroyed during the Second World War and was identically rebuilt at the end of it.  Its originality stems from its gabled walls. http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8220/8341838264_7259264be8_b.jpgThis is the Protestant Church of St. Paul's in Strasbourg and is a major landmark for the city. Built between 1892 and 1897 during the time of the Reichsland Elsass-Lothringen (1870–1918), the church was designed for the Lutheran members of the Imperial German garrison stationed in Strasbourg. http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8078/8341839146_5b1c648e50_b.jpgIts two towers are the second tallest features in the city next to the cathedral tower. In 1919, after the return of Alsace to France, the church was handed over to the Lutheran Church and became its second parish church in the town after St. Thomas.http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8219/8341848912_963e896aed_b.jpgThe Sainte-Madeleine Church is another Catholic church in Strasbourg that was closed when I visited. It was built in Gothic style in the late 15th century but largely rebuilt in a style close to Jugendstil after a devastating fire in 1904. This is the fourth building dedicated to Mary Magdalene built in the city since the 13th century.  http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8081/8341843462_fcbf0aa79b_b.jpgOn Place Gutenberg is a statue dedicated to one of the town's most famous residents.  Depicted on the statue’s four plinth panels are the benefits the world has gained thanks to the invention of modern printing.  http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8220/8341843800_54ff1fb714_b.jpgAlso on Place Gutenberg was the Christmas market featuring the guest country of Georgia.  I was so glad to see some traditional Georgian culture again and try some of their fresh grilled khachapuri.  http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8213/8340774827_4274e06e86_b.jpgI took a lot of photos of the Christmas markets but you can get a much better idea of what it looked like by visiting this site with its many wonderful photographs.  Enjoy.http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8356/8340775271_3cbb70cd5e_b.jpg

 

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Published by The Baguette - in Architecture
January 10 2013 5 10 /01 /January /2013 10:56

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8492/8366161307_2365f0e35d_b.jpgAlthough most people will probably say that the Cathedral is the most spectacular building in Strasbourg, I would have to say that despite its size the Protestant Church of St-Pierre-le-Jeune is equally impressive.  Its charm reads like an open book with its numerous paintings and frescoes which date from the 14th century.  http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8363/8341811368_26b82e4f80_b.jpgThree successive churches have stood on this site.  All that remains of the first church is a tomb with five funeral recesses, believed to date from the end of the Roman occupation (4th century).  http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8515/8367416362_8cbfc27e21_b.jpgThe lovely restored cloisters belonged to the church built in 1031.  On the occasion of its consecration, probably by Pope Leo IX, in 1053 the church was given the name of the New St. Peter’s (Jung Sankt Peter) to distinguish it from another church dedicated to St. Peter which was renamed Old St. Peters.  http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8212/8340751855_9f308dbed3_b.jpghttp://farm9.staticflickr.com/8502/8341805312_6402cc3b56_b.jpgThe gothic rood screen with five arches, supporting the Silbermann organ of 1780, divides the choir from the rest of the church.  http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8493/8341805614_6dd094b871_b.jpgThe rood screen is decorated in oil paintings depicting the four Evangelists, painted by Engelhardt in 1620.  http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8353/8341809992_547509c5bb_b.jpgBeneath the rood screen to the left is a 13th century statue of a monk holding a cup (“piscina”).  Beyond the organ is the choir, slightly lower than the nave, dating from the end of the 13th century.  http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8362/8340751393_c3d29d1bc3_b.jpgOn the west wall of the central nave is the famous “Navicella” fresco, after Giotto’s Storm on the Sea of Galilee in St Peter’s, Rome.  http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8351/8341807898_67a696107b_b.jpgThe nave, consecrated in 1320 is made up of three bays with cross-ribbed vaulting between the rood screen and the transept.  All of the walls are decorated with frescoes which were restored in 1900.  Sadly, nearly all of them are water damaged and in desperate need of repair.  http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8084/8341806002_fd6b2c2bae_b.jpgAfter going through the St. Nicholas Chapel (14th century) one enters the cloisters.  http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8212/8341806362_3fd89b9faa_b.jpghttp://farm9.staticflickr.com/8360/8341807564_83e3066300_b.jpghttp://farm9.staticflickr.com/8077/8340748385_0139f0c1d9_b.jpghttp://farm9.staticflickr.com/8502/8341806964_0ea868d0f9_b.jpghttp://farm9.staticflickr.com/8504/8341806670_432c72e5fa_b.jpgThe cloisters are made up of three 11th century Romanesque galleries and a 14th century gothic gallery.  Despite considerable restoration they are considered to be the oldest surviving cloisters north of the Alps.  On the floor are numerous tombstones and epitaphs from the period between 14th and 18th centuries.  While I was there, an exposition of decorations used over the years in Place Kléber was being hosted by the church in the cloister area.  http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8362/8341809592_9827d6e974_b.jpgBack inside the church, passing beneath the brightly colored vaults of the rood screen one enters the 13th century choir.  http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8221/8341809208_5d905d2249_b.jpghttp://farm9.staticflickr.com/8071/8341808722_5d1fbb1f6c_b.jpghttp://farm9.staticflickr.com/8213/8340746093_633ea08020_b.jpgThe baroque panelling and the pulpit was added around the middle of the 18th century but the stunning bas-relief of Christ’s Resurrection is much older.  The central panel of the altarpiece dates from 1518.  Behind the altar is the apse, now used as a baptistery.  http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8351/8341807898_67a696107b_b.jpghttp://farm9.staticflickr.com/8499/8341808294_5c208b17c7_b.jpgMy favorite painting in the entire church is along the west wall of the south aisle depicting the nations of Europe marching towards the cross.  Between 1897 and 1901, the church, which had fallen into disrepair, was fundamentally overhauled by the Karlsruhe architect Carl Schäfer and the entrance to the church was moved and a new main portal was created.  http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8230/8366159527_602a58f01d_b.jpghttp://farm9.staticflickr.com/8078/8367226458_f33171f7f0_b.jpghttp://farm9.staticflickr.com/8237/8366159271_c5e605a303_b.jpgIt is quite unique as it is a copy of the northern entrance of the façade of the Strasbourg Cathedral and the allegorical figures of the Wise and Foolish Virgins.  The black pavement stones surrounding the church are patterned with white Stars of David.http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8084/8341804610_ce1dde8bb6_b.jpg

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Published by The Baguette - in Architecture